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NOLA INVENTIONS! Every Friday NOLAinspired will look at one thing that was invented in New Orleans. 
This week it’s all about: JAZZ FUNERAL! 
Jazz Funerals are very NOLA. We like to take a sad occasion and instead of the rest of the country we don’t mourn in silence, but rather celebrate the life of the departed. 
❝The tradition arises from African spiritual practices, French and Spanish martial musical traditions, and uniquely African-American cultural influences. The tradition was widespread among New Orleanians across ethnic boundaries at the start of the 20th century. As the common brass band music became wilder in the years before World War I, some white New Orleanians considered the hot music disrespectful, and such musical funerals became rare among the city’s white citizens. For much of the mid-20th century, the Catholic Church officially frowned on secular music at funerals, so for generations the tradition was largely confined to African American Protestant New Orleanians. After the 1960s it gradually started being practiced across ethnic and religious boundaries. Most commonly such musical funerals are done for individuals who are musicians themselves, connected to the music industry, or members of various social aid & pleasure clubs or Carnival krewes who make a point of arranging for such funerals for members..❞
❥ Art featured in photo by NOLAPIC.COM

NOLA INVENTIONS! Every Friday NOLAinspired will look at one thing that was invented in New Orleans. 

This week it’s all about: JAZZ FUNERAL! 

Jazz Funerals are very NOLA. We like to take a sad occasion and instead of the rest of the country we don’t mourn in silence, but rather celebrate the life of the departed. 

The tradition arises from African spiritual practices, French and Spanish martial musical traditions, and uniquely African-American cultural influences. The tradition was widespread among New Orleanians across ethnic boundaries at the start of the 20th century. As the common brass band music became wilder in the years before World War I, some white New Orleanians considered the hot music disrespectful, and such musical funerals became rare among the city’s white citizens. For much of the mid-20th century, the Catholic Church officially frowned on secular music at funerals, so for generations the tradition was largely confined to African American Protestant New Orleanians. After the 1960s it gradually started being practiced across ethnic and religious boundaries. Most commonly such musical funerals are done for individuals who are musicians themselves, connected to the music industry, or members of various social aid & pleasure clubs or Carnival krewes who make a point of arranging for such funerals for members..❞

 Art featured in photo by NOLAPIC.COM

Filed under nola inventions nola new orleans inventions new orleans jazz funeral art ceremony celebrate life nolapic.com

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